Mar. 15, 1863. W.R. Rich to J.D. Rich and W.A. "Tip" Powell

View images of this letter:

   

Transcription

                      Translation

Camp Lamar  Mar 15the 1863

 

   Deare  Brother     I Unc

More Avail my self with the

Present opertunity of Droping

yew A few lines Which will in

form yew that I am well and

i hope at this may come saft

to yew and find yew Engoing the

best of health I recivd a letter

from yew the other day wich W H

Brown fetch and I was Truly glad

to get it but i would A like it

better if there had a bin more

of it I havent any Newes of  interest

to rite to yew at this time Times is

hard heare and there ant no prospects

of them A getting any better Jimey

I had one of my jaw Teeth Poold out

yesturday and it liked to Kild

mee the Doctor made five triels at it

bee fore he could pool it out

i never did have nothing to hurt

mee as bad in my life Jimey there

Was some Negroes come heare to work

 

Page 2

 

yesturday and last Knight they

was a fooling with a bum shell

and throwed it in fire and the

poder cetch a fir and it blowed

a ginte one of the negroes legs and brok

it all to pecies Jimey you said at

yew and tip had got in a scrape

a bout taring down Clabe Butlers

Bridge yew orten to A dun it Jimey

i heare Bad tales on yew and Tip

i heard That yew Bothe had quit home

and wouldent dwo nothing but

rare a bout i bee liev if i was

yewons at i would go back in to

camps Jimey we hav got the

soriest set of officers at yew every

saw in yow life i recond that yew

heard that captin sexton was Throwed

out of office he is in the 4 E Ga Ridge

ment heare in town and we hant

heard from E M 1 Bowens case yet

i am mity fraid at it will go mity

hard withe him i dont no how will

bee our Capt yet Some think that

J C Simmons will bee appointed

   our Captin

 

Page 3

 

Liutenant Morgan and Sam

Dillard is a running for Captins

place i cant tell which will bee a

lected So i must come to a close

Jimey if i was yew i would stay ther

Just as long as i could yew must

rite soon and often so no more at present

only i remains your Brother until Death

From.. W.. R.. Rich.. To.. J.. D.. Rich..

A Few lines to W A Powell   Deare

cosin i take the present opertunity of droping

yew a few lines to let yew no that i am

well and i hop at it may come saft to yew and

find yew well i recevd a letter from yew the

other day which W H Brown brong and i

was glad to get hit but i would a liked it

better if hit had a bin a litle better ritten

but it don better than non i havent any

newes worth your attention to rite the boyes

is nearley all well Lee Bennett is

in the hose Pittle but he ant very bad

off Tip i Sorry to heare that yew and

Sosan had fell out i was lisning

every day to heare of yew and hur a

being married in the place of geting mad

 

Page 4

 

Tip i would like to see yew the best

sort but i dont no when i will unless

yew dwo come Tip yew and Jimey makes

out like yewons has had all the fun

this winter Tip yew wrote at yew expected

to bee down heare bye the midle of next

month if yew come i would like to hire

yew to take my place i would give

yew twenty five cents and pay it all

in shin plasters Tip i hav heard

several times that yew was married

but i never could heare how yew

was a guine to hav but i lowed

it was Jane Mulins i dident no

of no body else that yew would

hav a bout there Tip i heard

that yew had quit home Tip if

i was in your place i would stay

at home just as long as i could

or at least i think i would

So i wont Say no more

this time yew must rite soone

and tell mee all the newes yew

hav so good bye for this time  Frome

W....R... Rich..  To W. A.. Powell

 

 

Camp Lamar                                                                                       March the 15th, 1863

Dear brother,

I once more avail myself with the present opportunity of dropping you a few lines which will inform you that I am well, and I hope that this may come safe to you and find you enjoying the best of health. I received a letter from you the other day which W. H. Brown fetched, and I was truly glad to get it, but I would have liked it better if there had been more of it. I havenít any news of interest to write to you at this time. Times is hard here, and there ainít no prospects of them a-getting any better. Jimmy, I had one of my jaw teeth pulled out yesterday, and it liked to killed me. The doctor made five trials at it before he could pull it out. I never did have nothing to hurt me as bad in my life. Jimmy, there was some Negroes come here to work yesterday, and last night they was a-fooling with a bombshell and throwed it in [the] fire, and the powder caught afire, and it blowed against one of the Negroesí legs and broke it all to pieces. Jimmy, you said that you and Tip had got in a scrape about tearing down Clabe Butlerís bridge. You oughtnít to have done it. Jimmy, I hear bad tales on you and Tip. I heard that you both had quit home and wouldnít do nothing but rear about. I believe if I was you ones that I would go back into camps. Jimmy, we have got the sorriest set of officers that you ever saw in your life. I reckon that you heard that Captain Sexton was throwed out of office. He is in the 4 E Georgia Regiment here in town, and we havenít heard from E M I Bowenís case yet. I am mighty afraid that it will go mighty hard with him. I donít know who will be our captain yet. Some think that J. C. Simmons will be appointed our captain. Lieutenant Morgan and Sam Dillard is a-running for captainís place. I canít tell which will be elected. So I must come to a close. Jimmy, if I was you I would stay there just as long as I could. You must write soon and often. So no more at present, only I remains your brother until death.

From W. R. Rich to J. D. Rich

 

A few lines to W. A. Powell.

Dear cousin,

I take the present opportunity of dropping you a few lines to let you know that I am well, and I hope that it may come safe to you and find you well. I received a letter from you the other day which W. H. Brown brought, and I was glad to get it, but I would have liked it better if it had a-been a little better written, but it done better than none. I havenít any news worth your attention to write. The boys is nearly all well. Lee Bennett is in the hospital, but he ainít very bad off. Tip, I [was] sorry to hear that you and Susan had fell out. I was a-listening every day to hear of you and her a-being married in the place of getting mad. Tip, I would like to see you the best sort, but I donít know when I will unless you do come. Tip, you and Jimmy makes out like you ones has had all the fun this winter, Tip, you wrote that you expected to be down here by the middle of next month. If you come, I would like to hire you to take my place. I would give you twenty-five cents and pay it all in shin plasters. Tip, I have heard several times that you was married, but I never could hear how you was a-going to have, but I allowed it was Jane Mullins. I didnít know of nobody else that you would have about there. Tip, if I was in your place, I would stay at home just as long as I could, or at least I think I would. So I wonít say no more this time. You must write soon and tell me all the news you have. So goodbye for this time.

From W. R. Rich to W. A. Powell

 

 

Home    Contact Author Joe Cannon    About this Site   Copyright Information  

Cannon Civil War Letters

 Last Revised Date