Apr. 7, 1863. J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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J. M. Cannonís letter of April 7, 1863

 

Sessionvill S C    Jamesilent  Apriel the 7the 1863

My Dear wife I see My self this morning to Rit you a

few more lines whitch will inform you that I am well

with the exception of a bad Cold I am fater than i hav ever bin

in my life and I dont no what makes mee so for I dont

git much to eat I hop those lines May com safe to yor kind

handes and find you and the childrn all well and doing well

I Recievd your kind leter last night whitch aforded mee

a greadel of plesure to read hit and to hear that you was all

well as Common you said ther was sevrel wanting to by wone

of your cowes I think you had beter keep them tell I Com

home if I ever git to Com eny more I was going to Com

this week if I cold ov got my furlow and I think I Cold ov

got hit if the yankes had not ov Com in but they have Com

in by the thousandes the see is full of them and the land is full

of our men they say ther Com in twenty fiv thousand last

night and ther was that meny hear bee fore we thought

they wold commence the show this morning but they did

not Comence hit and ther is no chance for a man to git

off un tel the fight is over as soon as hit is over I will

try to Com if they dont kill mee and if they do you

must do the best you Can and Raise my litle fellowes

the best you Can I dont want no body els to Rais them

you Can raise my litle children Jest rit I think I hav got

that much confidence in you I think the fit has Comme

now at fort sumter the big guns is firing prety hevy now I

think hit will bee the bigest fit that has bin fought yet if they

 

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set in right I think by Sunday they will do what they

air goien to do I think this fit will close the wor for i think

the most of them is hear I dont want you to bee troubled a

bout hit you must put your trust in god hee is able to do

all thinges that is right and if hee thinkes hit best for mee

to com home again I shal bee with you a gain I  no one thing

I wold lov to bee with you all a gain I think we cold in Joy

our selves beter than we ever did bee fore hulda I Cant read your

leter you must devid your sylables and not put them all

 

                                       J. M. Cannon

 

to gether you Can beet mee a speling and youre leters

is maid good a nuf if you wold mot hav them all to gether

i was glad to see you trying to rit My Dear afectionat children

I want you all to bee good children and mind wat your mother

ses to you for you may never see mee eny more but I

hope to meet you all in heaven wher ther is no parting

of fathers and children and wives and husbandes I must close

for this time you must excuse my bad speling Rit

soon and often so good By for this time  J. M. Cannon to

                                                        Malinda Cannon

                                      Rit soon

 

 

 

Secessionville, S. C., James Island  [South Carolina]                April the 7rth 1863

My dear wife,

I seat myself this morning to write you a few more lines which will inform you that I am well with the exception of a bad cold.  I am fatter than I have ever been in my life, and I donít know what makes me so, for I donít get much to eat.  I hope those lines may come safe to your kind hands and find you and the children all well and doing well.  I received our kind letter last night which afforded me a great deal of pleasure to read it and to hear that you was all well as common.  You said there was several wanting to buy one of your cows.  I think you had better keep them Ďtil I come home, if I ever get to come anymore.  I was going to come this week if I could of got my furlough, and I think I could of got it if the Yankees had not of come in.  But they have come in by the thousands.  The sea is full of them, and the land is full of our men.  They say there come in twenty-five thousand last  night, and there was that many here before.  We thought they would commence the show this morning, but they did not commence it, and there is no chance for a man to get off until the fight is over.  As soon as it is over, I will try to come if they donít kill me, and if they do, you must do the best you can and raise my little fellows the best you can.  I donít want nobody else to raise them.  You can raise my little children just right, I think.  I have got that much confidence in you.  I think the fight has commenced now at Fort Sumter.  The big guns is firing pretty heavy now.  I think it will be the biggest fight that has been fought yet if they set in right.  It think by Sunday they will do what they are going to do.  I think this fight will close the war, for I think the most of them is here.  I donít want you to be troubled about it.  You must put your trust in God.  He is able to do all things that is right, and if He thinks it is best for me to come home again, I shall be with you again.  I know one thing:  I would love to be with you all again.  I think we could enjoy ourselves better than we ever did before.  Hulda, I canít read your letter.  You must divide your syllables and not put them all together.  You can beat me a-spelling, and your letters is made good enough if you would not have them all together.  I was glad to see you trying to write.  My dear, affectionate children, I want you all to be good children and mind what your mother says to you, for you may never see me anymore.  But I hope to meet you all in heaven where there is no parting of fathers and children and wives and husbands.  I must close for this time.  You must excuse by bad spelling.  Write soon and often.  So, good-by for this time.

J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

Write soon!    

 

 

 

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