Apr. 12, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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J. M. Cannonís letter of April 12th, 1863

 

 

Sessionvill  S C   Jamesilent               April the 12the 1863

My Dear wife I seet my self this bautifull Saberth

morning to Rit you a few lines whitch will in form

you that I am well at this time hoping those few lines may

Com safe to your kind hands in due time and find you and

the children all well and harty we havent had eny more fit

ing sence the 7 day of the month the fit lasted too oures and

a half we got fiv men hurt prety bad by one of our

big gunes falling down we dont no how meny yankes got

hurt ther was one yankey Capten floted out to shore and the

bigest iron Clad they had sunk and too or three more prety

badley Cripled the yankes is still lying a round this

place they say they air going to commence the fite again in

the morning I dont think the yankes can ever git this place

tho they may they will have a heep of men to kill furst

bee fore they can git hit ther is no chance for mee to com

home tell the yankes leaves this place I am goien to com

home as soon as they leave this place if they dont kill mee

I am a fraid I shant git to com in time to mak eny raing

mentes for making eny crop and if I dont you must do

wat you think is best for your self we hav to stay

Rit in Campes now we cant git to go fifty yardes off

tell the yankes leaves this place hit is prety hard on

us now

we hav so

much gard

duty to do the pickett has som litle fightes

 

Page 2

 

My Dear wife I coment this leter a Sunday and I did not git

hit finisht tell the 14 day of Apriel I thought I wold wait tell

the mail Com to see if I got aire leter and I did not git no leter tell

last night bairing dat the 8 instant I Recievd your kind leter whitch

I red with great plesure and was glad to hear from you a gain you

said you had the chance to git a man in my place for four mo

ntes I Cant git to tak in a man in that way and if I Cold

I wld not giv him half his price for we had jest as well pair

ish one way as a nother I cant make four hundred dollars in

four year I want you to rit as soon as you git this leter what

that manes name is hee dont need no money I dont

think or else hee wold work cheeper the yankes is all leeving

hear now and I dont think they will ever try this place eny

more as soon as I can git a furlow now I will com home

hit takes too or three weekes to git one after you comence

hit has to go through so meny handes bee fore a man can travle

on hit one man cant tak a nother mans place hear on Jim

ilent hit has bin trid by too or thee sence I hav bin hear if

that man was to go to the wore hee wold hav to go in for the wor

long or short I want to see you all mity bad and I think I

will see you all soon those few lines leaves mee well and I hope

they may reach you and find you all in joyen the same blesinges

so fairwell for this time            J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

   Rit soon and often so nothing more onley Remain your husband

 

 

 

Secessionville, S. C., James Island             April the 12th, 1863

My dear wife,

I seat myself this beautiful Sabbath morning to write you a few lines which will inform you that I am well at this time, hoping those few lines may come safe to your kind hands in due time and find you and the children all well and hearty. We havenít had any more fighting since the 7th day of the month. The fight lasted two hours and a half. We got five men hurt pretty bad by one of our big guns falling down. We donít know how many Yankees got hurt. There was one Yankee captain floated out to shore, and the biggest ironclad they had sunk, and two or three more pretty badly crippled.[1] The Yankees is still lying around this place. They say they are going to commence the fight in the morning. I donít think the Yankees can ever get this place, though they may. They will have a heap of men to kill first before they can get it. There is no chance for me to come home Ďtil the Yankees leaves this place. I am going to come home as soon as they leave this place if they donít kill me. I am afraid I shanít get to come in time to make any arrangements for making any crop, and if I donít you must do what you think is best for yourself. We have to stay right in camps now. We canít get to go fifty yards off Ďtil the Yankees leaves this place. It is pretty hard on us now. We have so much guard duty to do. The picket has some little fights.

 

My dear wife,

I commenced this letter a Sunday, and I did not get it finished Ďtil the 14th day of April. I thought I would wait Ďtil the mail come to see if I got any letter, and I did not get no letter Ďtil last night bearing date the 8th instant. I received your kind letter which I read with great pleasure and was glad to hear from you again. You said you had the chance to get a man in my place for four months. I canít get to take in a man in that way, and if I could I would not give him half his price, for we had just as well perish one way as another. I canít make four hundred dollars in four year. I want you to write as soon as you get this letter what that manís name is. He donít need no money, I donít think, or else he would work cheaper. The Yankees is all leaving here now, and I donít think they will ever try this place any more. As soon as I can get a furlough now I will come home. It takes two or three weeks to get one after you commence, it has to go through so many hands before a man can travel on it. One man canít take another manís place here on Jim Island. It has been tried by two or three since I have been here. If that man was to go to the war he would have to go in for the war, long or short. I want to see you all mighty bad, and I think I will see you all soon. Those few lines leaves me well, and I hope they may reach you and find you all enjoying the same blessings. So farewell for this time.

J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

    Write soon and often, so nothing more, only remain your husband.

 

[1] On April 5, 1863, the Ironclad Fleet of the North--consisting of the flagship Ironsides, six other monitors, and the Keokuk, a double-turreted vessel--anchored off Charleston, South Carolina.  On April 7 Fort Moultrie opened fire on the advancing ironclads which immediately fired on Fort Sumter.  On April 8 the Keokuk, the most-damaged ship in the action, sank off Fort Sumter.  At Fort Sumter five Confederate soldiers were injured by splinters from the traverse.  Brigadier General S. R. Gist commanded the Confederate forces at Fort Johnson, James Island.  On April 12 the fleet of monitors withdrew from the Charleston area.   From Civil War @ Charleston Website.

 

 

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