Apr. 20, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

View images of this letter:

   

Transcription

                      Translation

J. M. Cannonís letter of April 20, 1863

 

Secessionvill S C   James ilent           Apriel the 20the 1863

my Dear wife it is through the goodnis of the lord that I am

permited to rit you a few more lines whitch will in form

you that I am well at this time hoping those few lines

may com safe to your kind handes and find you all well

and doing well I hav no newse to Rit to you of in trust

at this time onley we air looking for afight

evry day if they was not looking for the yankes now

I Cold git to Come home now to see how things . . .

and I may git to Com eny how I am going  to . . .

Com if I can I recievd your kind leter last night and was glad

to hear from you hit dos mee a heepe of good to hear that you air

all well but I was vary sorow to hear that you had lost your

lether you art to ataken out a serch worent rit strat and I think

you Cold a found hit hit lookes like I hav got no friendes left

at home or else they wold tento such thinges as that hit dos mak

mee mity mad to think that ther is eny such men left at home

I hop I will out live this wor and git home and if I do and find that

man I think I will git his lether dont say eny thing a bout

what I hav said in this leter if I git to com home I shal hunt

for him or them too or three dayes them is the kind of men

that I want to kill I say no more a bout that at this time

you must excuse my bad Riting and spelling for I am

pestered a

bout such

Conduct when a man leaves his family and ges to fit for his

Countrey then Som body must steel what litle hee leaves

 

Page 2

 

for his famley my Dear wif you said you wold put hulda to plow

ing I am a fraid for hur to plow poll the Colt will git tangle

in the gears and then shee will git loose from hur and I wold not

hav that don for all they mak mother you must do the best you

Can I no you Cant do lik I Cold if I was there you wanted mee

≠≠. . .  a subsiut I wold git mee one if I Cold but I dont no

. . .  I Cold git ther is non hear that I Can git and

. . .  of non there if you no of eny up there you Can git

him or rit too mee what hee can bee got for you said you had

Columbus a plowing I wold lov to see him a plowing

Columbus I want you to bee a mity good boy tell I com home

mother I dont want you to work out non if you do you will

bee lid up you now you cant stand hit I must close my

leter for this time hoping they may com safe to your

kind handes in due time find you and the children all

well and doing well so firwell for this time so nothing  mor

onley I Remain your loving husband untel Deth

           J. M. Cannon to   Malinda Cannon and children

   Rit soon and often

 

 

 

Secessionville, S. C.    James Island                                                     April the 20th, 1863

My dear wife,

   It is through the goodness of the Lord that I am permitted to write you a few more lines which will inform you that I am well at this time, hoping those few lines may come safe to your kind hands and find you all well and doing well. I have no news to write to you of interest at this time, only we are looking for a fight every day. If they was not looking for the Yankees now, I could get to come home now to see how things . . .  and I may get to come anyhow. I am going to . . . come if I can. I received your kind letter last night and was glad to hear from you. It does me a heap of good to hear that you are all well, but I was very sorry to hear that you had lost your leather. [1]You ought to a-taken out a search warrant right straight, and I think you could have found it. It looks like I have got no friends left at home or else they would tend to such things as that. It does make me mighty mad to think that there is any such men left at home. I hope I will outlive this war and get home, and if I do and find that man I think I will get his leather. Donít say anything about what I have said in this letter. If I get to come home I shall hunt for him or them two or three days. Them is the kind of men that I want to kill. I say no more about that at this time. You must excuse my bad writing and spelling, for I am pestered about such conduct when a man leaves his family and goes to fight for his country, then somebody must steal what little he leaves for his family. My dear wife, you said you put Hulda to plowing. I am afraid for her to plow Poll. The colt will get tangled in the gears, and then she will get loose from her, and I would not have that done for all they make. Mother, you must do the best you can. I know you canít do like I could if I was there. You wanted me . . .  a substitute. I would get one if I could, but I donít know   . . .  I could get. There is none here that I can get, and . . . none there. If you know of any up there, you can get him or write to me what he can be got for. You said you had Columbus a-plowing. I would love to see him a-plowing. Columbus, I want you to be a mighty good boy Ďtil I come home. Mother, I donít want you to work out none. If you do, you will be laid up. You know you canít stand it. I must close my letter for this time, hoping they may come safe to your kind hands in due time, find you and the children all well and doing well. So, farewell for this time. So nothing more, only I remain your loving husband until death.

       J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon and children

  Write soon and often!

 

[1] In addition to being a farmer, John Milton Cannon and his wife Malinda operated a tannery with ďMr. Mosely/Mosley,Ē their business partner.  

 

 

Home    Contact Author Joe Cannon    About this Site   Copyright Information  

Cannon Civil War Letters

 Last Revised Date