Jun. 21, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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            Camp near Vernon Miss

                        June the 21th 1863

                Mrs Malinda Cannon

Dear wife  I am blest with a

nother opertunity of righting

to you whitch will in form

you how I am giting a long at

this time my helth is tolerb

good at this time hoping when

those lines Comes to your kind

handes they may find you

and the children all in joyen

the same like blesing I have noth

ing very strang to right to you

onley we air all hear lying in

woods Like hogs and we dont

git much to eat a that and the

water is mity bad that we

hav to drank hear in missippi

I think of your good spring evry day

 

page 2

 

I Recievd your kind and afectione

Leter this morning whitch giv

mee grat satisfaction to hear

from you one time more I have

not hurn from you sence I lef

t Charlston and you may no

I was giting vary uneasy a bout

home for that is all the plesure that

I see is when I git a leter from

you I wold lov to bee at home with

you now to git som of that good

sweet milk to eat I dremed last

night I was with you all and I

thought I was playing with my

Litle boy and I do wish hit had

a bin so for you dont no how

bad I want to see you and the

children som times I git so I

wold giv evry thing I hav got to

git to see you all again it

 

page 3

 

Lookes like I am so fur from home

I never will git to see you eny

more but I liv in hopes that

the time is not fur off when

we will all return to our homes

a gain & spend a few more days in peace &

hapiness to gether as we have done in days past

& gone I will say to you that if you can

find any person that will take them three

lots of land that lies round thare & take my

place you can send them on for I am willing

to give them to any person that will take

my place in the army for I had rather

bee at home & have nuthing than to stay here

& have as much more as I have got for if

I was thare I cold see a little pleasure but as I

am here I cant see any; you stated in your

letter that there was some close at Mr woodwards

& that you did not know whether they was mine

or not I will say to you that I expect that

 

page 4

 

they are mine so I will state what kind I

sent as near as I can there was one over coat

& one short coat & one pair of Pants the short

coat & pants was the same color a sort of a Bark

Die there was no other close in the Box like

them & the over coat I recon you wood know

it for it was the same one I wore off from

home when I left & there was some old socks

though they was not much a count & I also sent

my Brown Jenes coat & I recon you will know

it as it was not very much Damage for I had

not wore it a grate eal; So you must tel Mr

Mosley that I want him to rite to me & let me now

how he is a giting  a long as I have a bad chance

to rite & when I get the chance to rite it seemes

like I have to rite home so he must not think hard

of me not riting to him so Nomore only I remain

your loving husband tel Death  J.M. Cannon to

Malinda Cannon  rite soon & Direct your letters

to Canton Miss in care Gist Brigade

or in care of capt Morgan 8th Ga Batt Gist Brigade

 

 

 

 

Camp near Vernon, Mississippi

June the 21st, 1863

 

Dear wife,

I am blest with another opportunity of writing to you which will inform you how I am getting along at this time.  My health is tolerable good at this time, hoping when those lines comes to your kind hands, they may find you and the children all enjoying the same like blessing.  I have nothing very strange to write to you, only we are all here lying in [the] woods like hogs, and we don’t get much to eat at that, and the water is mighty bad that we have to drink here is Mississippi.  I think of your good spring every day.  I received your kind and affectionate letter this morning which give me great satisfaction to hear from you one time more.  I have not heard from you since I left Charleston, and you may know I was getting very uneasy about home, for that is all the pleasure that I see is when I get a letter from you.  I would love to be at home with you now to get some of that good sweet milk to eat.  I dreamed last night I was with you all, and I thought I was playing with my little boy, and I do wish it had a been so, for you don’t know how bad I want to see you and the children.  Sometimes I get so I would give everything I have got to get to see you all again.  It looks like I am so far from home I never will get to see you anymore, but I live in hopes that the time is not far off when we will all return to our homes again & spend a few more days in peace & happiness together as we have done in days past & gone.  I will say to you that if you can find any person that will take them three lots of land that lies round there & take my place, you can send them on. For I am willing to give them to any person that will take my place in the army, for I had rather be at home & have nothing than to stay here & have as much more as I have got. For if I was there I could see a little pleasure, but as I am here I can’t see any.  You stated in your letter that there was some clothes at Mr. Woodward’s[1] & that you did not know whether they was mine or not.  I will say to you that I expect that they are mine, so I will state what kind I sent as near as I can.  There was one overcoat & one short coat & one pair of pants.  The short coat & pants was the same color:  a sort of a bark dye.  There was no other clothes in the box like them.  And the overcoat I reckon you would know it, for it was the same one I wore off from home when I left. And there was some old socks, though they was not much account. And I also sent my brown jeans coat, & I reckon you will know it as it was not very much damaged, for I had not wore it a great deal.  So you must tell Mr. Mosley[2] that I want him to write to me & let me know how he is getting along. As I have had a bad chance to write, & when I get the chance to write, it seems like I have to write home, so he must not think hard of me not writing to him.  No more, only I remain your loving husband ‘til death.

J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

Write soon & direct your letters to Canton, Mississippi, in care of Gist Brigade, [3] or in care of Capt. Morgan, 8th Ga. Batt., Gist Brigade[4]

 


 

[1] Possibly, a reference to Ephraim Woodward, a neighboring farmer in Sonora, Gordon County, Georgia.  1860 Georgia Census, Gordon County, Sonora.

 

[2] Mr. Mosley/Mosely was the business partner of John Milton Cannon in a tannery.

[3] Before leaving the Charleston area, the 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry became part of the Army of Tennessee commanded by General Joseph E. Johnston, Hardee’s Corps commanded by Lt. General B. F. Cheatham, Gist Brigade commanded by Colonel W. G. Foster, 8th Georgia Battalion commanded by Lt. Colonel Z. L. Wallers.

 

[4] Edward F. Morgan, Company B, 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry, Rank in Captain, Rank out Major.  Film # M226, Roll 43

 

 

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