About Jul. 15, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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                      Translation

. . . I do not know what is the reason that you

did not get them you stated in  your letter that you

wanted to know if I wanted you to send me any

close or not that is if you had the chance I will say

to you that you need not send me any close until

I send for them as I dont want to have to toat them

this is one of the times that I dont want many things

to toat as it is the hotest weather here that I ever

saw you also wanted to know if Mr Donalson

had rote to me I will say to you that he has

not and you stated that he had not paid you yet

you can tel him to pay you what he owes

me as I dont know presisley what it is I recon

he will do rite a bout it; you stated in your

letter that you had not Bin to meting since I

left home I was sory to here that as I want you to go to

meting as often as you can & try to do rite & pray for

me that I may be permited to return home one more

time to enjoy myself with you & the children a

little while a gain before we die as it is my

earnest Desire & prair to god that I may see you &

the children one time more & spend a few more

days to gether in peace as it has bin a

long time since I have seene you you dont

know how bad I want to see you & the children

I wood give any thing in the world that I have got if

 

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the war wold end so that I cold get to come home

I was sory to here that you faild in geting me

a substitute But it may bee all for the Better

for what I know so I will close for this time hoping

to here from you soone a gain but I dont know whare

for you to direct your letters you need not rite to me

any more until I rite to you as I dont know whare for

you to diret yor letter so Nothing More only I remain

your affectionate Husband tel Death  J. M. Cannon to

                                                 Malinda Cannon

 

A Few lines to Hulda Powell    Dear sister it is

with pleasure that I rite these few lines to let you know

that I am well at present hoping these few lines

may find you and familey enjoying the Best of health

I Received a letter from you & Cyrus a few days

a go which was dated the 27th of June which stated

that you was all well which I was glad to here &

you stated that you wanted me to try to send

Williams things home if I cold & if he had any money

to send it home if I pleased if I cold & if I was not able

for Dickert to do it I will say to you that I cannot get

nuthing that he had as the yankeys has got Betwene

where he dide & whare we are I will do all I can to get his

things home the capt rote to the surgan to send his things home

but I dont know whither he done it or not he had some money but I dont

know how much I will rite more about it the next time  J. M. Cannon  

 

 

 

[About July 15, 1863][1]

Mississippi[2]

. . . I do not know what is the reason that you did not get them.  You stated in your letter that you wanted to know if I wanted you to send me any clothes or not.  That is, if you had the chance.  I will say to you that you need not send me any clothes until I send for them, as I donít want to have to tote them.  This is one of the times that I donít want many things to tote, as it is the hottest weather here that I ever saw.  You also wanted to know if Mr. Donaldson[3] had wrote to me.  I will say to you that he has not, & you stated that he had not paid you yet.  You can tell him to pay you what he owes me as I donít know precisely what it is.  I reckon he will do right about it.  You stated in your letter that you had not been to meeting since I left home.  I was sorry to hear that as I want you to go to meeting as often as you can & try to do right.  And pray for me that I may be permitted to return home one more time to enjoy myself with you and the children a little while again before we die as it is my earnest desire & prayer to God that I may see you & the children one more time & spend a few more days together in peace as it has been a long time since I have seen you.  You donít know how bad I want to see you & the children. I would give anything in the world that I have got if the war would end so that I could get to come home.  I was sorry to hear that you failed in getting me a substitute, but it may be all for the better for what I know.  So I will close for this time, hoping to hear from you soon again, but I donít know where for you to direct your letters.  You need not write to me anymore until I write to you as I donít know where for you to direct your letter.  So nothing more, only I remain your affectionate husband Ďtil death.

J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

 

A few lines to Hulda Powell[4]

Dear sister,

It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to let you know that I am well at present, hoping these few lines may find you and your family enjoying the best of health.  I received a letter from you & Cyrus[5] a few days ago which was dated the 27th of June which stated that you was all well, which I was glad to hear.  And you stated that you wanted me to try to send Williamís[6] things home if I could, & if he had any money to send it home if I pleased if I could, and if I was not able for Dickert[7] to do it.  I will say to you that I cannot get nothing that he had, as the Yankees has got between where he died & where we are.  I will do all I can to get this things home.  The captain wrote to the surgeon to send his things home, but I donít know whether he done it or not.  He had some money, but I donít know how much.  I will write more about it the next time.

J. M. Cannon

 


 

[1] The first page of this letter is missing; therefore, the date must be estimated.   In his letter of July 28, 1863, Milton states, ďAs I wrote to you in my last letter that you need not write until you hear from me again . . . .Ē  Milton made this comment about Malindaís not writing to him until he had a new address in the letter above.  Therefore, an approximate date for this letter would be before his letter of July 28, 1863, and after his earlier letter with a known date of June 26, 1863.  A mid-point estimate would be July 15, 1863.

 

[2] The first page of this letter is missing; therefore, the place must be estimated.  On June 26, 1863, John Milton Cannon wrote a letter to Malinda from a camp near Vernon, Mississippi.  On July 28, 1863, Milton wrote another letter to Malinda from a camp near Morton, Mississippi.  Since this letter was written between these two letters (see prior footnote), Milton was in Mississippi when it was written.

 

[3] Two families by the name of Donaldson lived in Gordon County, Georgia, in 1860óthe families of William J. Donaldson and of Rufin A. Donaldson.  By the 1870 Gordon County Census, only the Rufin A. Donaldson family remained; so Rufin is probably the person to whom Milton was referring.  Rufin A. Donaldson was a farmer born in 1818 in North Carolina.  He would have been 46 when this letter was written.

 

[4] Hulda Serena Cannon Rich Powell was born in South Carolina on May 28, 1823, to Russel E. and Elizabeth Cannon.  She was the older sister of John Milton Cannon.  In 1842 Hulda married William Dyson Rich; the couple had four sons before Williamís early death in 1849. Hulda married Cyrus Powell in 1853.  Hulda and Cyrus had seven children.  Hulda died in 1894 in Gordon County, Georgia, where she had lived most of her life.

 

[5] Cyrus Powell was the second of Hulda Serena Cannonís husbands.  Cyrus was born September 11, 1825, in South Carolina and married Hulda in 1853.  He helped to rear her four sons by her first husband William Dyson Rich as well as the seven children that he and Hulda had.   Cyrus died August 28, 1893, in Gordon County.  Both Cyrus and Hulda are buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Pleasant Hill, Georgia.

 

[6] William Russell Rich was the oldest of four sons born to William Dyson Rich and Hulda Serena Cannon Rich.  He was born on January 18, 1843.  His middle name ďRussellĒ was probably given to him to honor his grandfather Russel E. Cannon.   William never married.  He joined the 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry in early-1862 and remained in the Confederate Army until his death on June 6, 1863, in a hospital in Canton, Mississippi, of an unknown fever.  He is buried in Canton with other Confederate soldiers.

[7] William Henry Dickert, like John Milton Cannon, was from Gordon County, Georgia.  He married Mary Alpha Powell, a sister of Cyrus Powell (see footnote above).  Dickert was born in 1826 in South Carolina.  He enlisted in the 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry in late-1862 as did John Milton Cannon. The two men served together until Miltonís capture in July 1864.  Dickert died in 1869 in Gordon County, Georgia.

 

 

 

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