Jul. 28, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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                      Translation

       A few lines to Malinda Cannon

Camp Near Morton Miss July 28th 1863

Dear wife & children it is with much

pleasure that I take the present

opportunity of riting you a few

lines to let you know that I am not

very well at this time though I am

not very Bad off I am a nocking a

Bout as comon but my feet is

swelen so that I cannot ware

my shoes But they are some better

than they have bin I think they will

get well before long or I hope so;

though I truly hope that these few

lines may come safe to your kind

hand in due time & find you

all enjoying the Best of health I

have nuthing strange to communicate

to you at present only that we are

here in the woods a lying a bout

like hogs & a doing the Best we can

& that is Bad Enuf I will say to you that

                           I dont think we will

 

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stay here much longer but I dont

know whare we will go when we

leave here I will say to you that

I want you to rite to me as often as

you can as I wood bee glad to here

from you Evry day you can direct your

letters as you have bin & they will

come to me as I rote to you in my last

letter that you need not rite until you

heard from me a gain you can rite to

me as often as you pleas & direct your

letters as you have bin doing & they will come

to me so rite soone & often as I want

to see you & the children the worst in

the world it dont seeme like I can

stand it much longer without coming home

I want you to take good care of your

self & do right as I hope you will until

I can return home that is if I get that chance

& I hope I will before a grate while; so

I must close for this time Nomore only I remain

your loving  husband tel Death    J.M. Cannon

                       to Malinda Cannon

 

 

 

A few lines to Malinda Cannon.

Camp near Morton,[1] Mississippi

July 28th, 1863

 

Dear wife & children,

It is with much pleasure that I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am not very well at this time, though I am not very bad off.  I am a-knocking about as common, but my feet is swelling so that I cannot wear my shoes, but they are some better than they have been.  I think they will get well before long, or I hope so.  Though I truly hope that these few lines may come safe to your kind hand in due time & find you all enjoying the best of health.  I have nothing strange to communicate to you at present, only that we are here in the woods a-lying about like hogs & a-doing the best we can, & that is bad enough.  I will say to you that I donít think we will stay here much longer, but I donít know where we will go when we leave here.  I will say to you that I want you to write to me as often as you can, as I would be glad to hear from you every day.  You can direct your letters as you have been, and they will come to me.  As I wrote to you in my last letter that you need not write until you heard from me again, you can write to me as often as you please, & direct your letters as you have been doing, & they will come to me.  So write soon & often as I want to see you & the children the worst in the world.  It donít seem like I can stand it much longer without coming home.  I want you to take good care of yourself & do right, as I hope you will, until I can return home.  That is, if I get that chance, & I hope I will before a great while.  So I must close for this time.  No more, only I remain your loving husband Ďtil death.

      J.M. Cannon   to   Malinda Cannon

 


 

[1] After the Confederate forces surrendered at Vicksburg, Mississippi, Union forces under General William T. Sherman approached Jackson, Mississippi, on July 10, 1863, and began siege actions and sharp shooting.  The Confederates went into trenches that they had prepared after the first Battle of Jackson in mid-May 1863.  The left flank of the Confederate line rested at the Pearl River to guard pontoon bridges that they might have to use in case of retreat.  Six days after the second Battle of Jackson began, on the night of July 16th, General Joseph E. Johnston ordered the evacuation of the Confederate forces.  They slipped out of the city and retreated across the Pearl River by means of the pontoon bridges.  The Confederatesí rear guard eventually fell back to the vicinity of Morton, Mississippi, where they passed a relatively peaceful six weeks until joining the Army of Tennessee once more for the Chickamauga Campaign.

 

 

 

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