Aug. 11 & 12, 1863. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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                      Translation

      this the 11the 1863

   this the 12 august 1863

                 Camp near Morten

          mississippi   this the 11the

                          day of August 1863                               

Dear wife hit is through the

goodnis of god that I am

per mited to rit you a few

lines whitch will in form

you how I am giting along

I am not vary well at this

time but I am still up and

about I hope when those few

lines Comes to your kind

hand they may find you

and the children all in

the best of helth and a

dooing well I recievd your

kind leter baring dat the 11

hit come to hand the 8 and

you dont no how much

 

Page 2

 

hit don mee to hear from

home for I hav not hearn from

home sence edmon borders com

back and I was proud to git a

leter and I was glad to hear that

you was all well you was talk

ing a bout selling som of your

stock and if you do you mus

think a bout the money bee ing

no Count hit takes ten to bee

worth as much as one I dont

think I Can stay from home

much longer hit dos look lik

I am a blige to see you all a

gain when I saw them whit

hairs that Com out of your

hed you dont no nothing a

bout my feeling I wold

giv all that I hav got if I was

at home a long with you

you said som thing a bout

Renting I hope I will

 

Page 3

 

Bee at home in time for

Renting and if I dont you

must rent all you Can of

the land you must hav as

much sod as you can I want

all of that feeld soad wher

Mrs Dickert lives you Can

rent hit to hur if shee will

so hit all in wheet and

you Can let hur hav as much

Corn land as shee wantes to

tend I doo wish I was at home

now so I Cold git som good

sweet milk and peach

py we hav to giv from one

doller to one and a half for

all the peaches that we eat

hear apeles is worth too doll

ars a dosen som three dollers

and we Cant eat meney at

a leven dollers a month evry

thing is mity high hear

 

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     J.M.  to Malinda Cannon

I think we will all git to

com home bee fore long I think

they air trying to mak peace

now but I cant tell whether

they will ever git hit fixt

up or not I hop they will

I want you to liv in good hart

tell I do Com if I ever do com

and if I liv much longer I

will see you all agan if they

dont let mee Com I am going

to com eny how I want you to

liv rit and do right and raise

my little children rit I hop

I will git to help you rais

them yet I must Close my

leter for this time so nothing

more onley I remaine you

loving husband untel

Deth    J M to Malinda

 

 

 

August 11th and 12th, 1863

Camp near Morton, Mississippi

 

Dear wife,

     It is through the goodness of God that I am permitted to write you a few lines which will inform you how I am getting along.  I am not very well at this time, but I am still up and about.  I hope when those few lines comes to your kind hand, they may find you and the children all in the best of health and a-doing well.  I received your kind letter bearing date the 11th.  It come to hand the 8th, and you donít know how much [good] it done me to hear from home, for I have not heard from home since Edmon Borders[1] come back, and I was proud to get a letter, and I was glad to hear that you was all well.  You was talking about selling some of your stock, and if you do, you must think about the money being no account.  It takes ten to be worth as much as one.[2]  I donít think I can stay from home much longer.  It does look like I am obliged to see you all again when I saw them white hairs that come out of your head.  You donít know nothing about my feeling.  I would give all that I have got if I was at home along with you.  You said something about renting.  I hope I will be at home in time for renting, and if I donít you must rent all you can of the land.[3]  You must have as much sod as you can.  I want all of that field sowed where Mrs. Dickert[4] lives.  You can rent it to her if she will sow it all in wheat, and you can let her have as much corn land as she wants to tend.[5] I do wish I was at home now so I could get some good sweet milk and peach pie.  We have to give from one dollar to one and a half for all the peaches that we eat here.  Apples is worth two dollars a dozen, some three dollars, and we canít eat many at eleven dollars a month.  Everything is mighty high here.

      J.M. to Malinda Cannon

I think we will all get to come home before long.  I think they are trying to make peace now, but I canít tell whether they will ever get it fixed up or not.  I hope they will.  I want you to live in good heart Ďtil I do come, if I ever do come, and if I live much longer I will see you all again.  If they donít let me come, I am going to come anyhow.  I want you to live right and raise my little children right.  I hope I will get to help you raise them yet.  I must close my letter for this time.  So nothing more, only I remain your loving husband until death.

     J.M. to Malinda

 


 

[1] Edmund Borders served with John Milton Cannon in Company B of the 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry. Edmund, b. 1838, was the son of Andrew and Louisa Borders.  The Borders family lived in Silaquoy, Gordon County, Georgia, in 1860.  1860 Georgia Census, Gordon County, Silaquoy.

 

[2] During the Civil War, commodity prices rose in the Confederacy while the gold value of Confederate currency and bonds declined.

[3] The 1860 Agricultural Census, Georgia, Gordon County, indicated that John Milton Cannon owned 50 improved acres and 110 unimproved acres.

 

[4] Alpha Powell Dickert, b. 1824, S. C., was the wife of William Henry Dickert who served with John Milton Cannon throughout the Civil War.  Alpha and their children lived near Silaquoy, Gordon County, Georgia, not far from the home of Malinda Cannon.  1860 Georgia Census, Gordon County, Silaquoy, Calhoun P.O.

 

[5] The 1860 Agricultural Census, Georgia, Gordon County, indicated that John Milton Cannonís farm produced, among other crops, 75 bushels of wheat and 300 bushels of Indian corn.

 

 

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