Oct. 16, 1863. Malinda Cannon to J.M. Cannon

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                      Translation

            This October the

16    1863

My Dear Husband it is

with grate pleasure that I

have seated My self for

the purposs of droping you

a few lines wich will in

form you that columbus has

bin sick more than a week

haveing chills ever day

and the rest of us is all

tolerble well i truly

hope those few lines may

come safe to youre cind

hand in due time and find

you enjoying the state of

good health I receive youre

cind letter the 14 of this

instant and I was blest

with joy to here from you

and to here that you was

well Milton i want you to

rite to me wether you

 

Page 2

 

have got any tents stay in

or not or wether you have to

take the wether as it come

or not i want you if there

is any chace for you to get to

come home to get a furlow

and come home this winter

i was glad to here that youre

health was still inproveing

i pray for youre health

all the time and that you

may get to come home a gain

and come through thes miserble

Distressing battel it is My

honerbly Desire that you may

be spaird throgh all danger

and get to come home and

spend a few more days

in pleasure as we have

once in time past and gone

I saw Mr. Barnwell and he told

me how you was geting a

long and he all so gave

 

Page 3

 

me that money that you

sent i am a going to

so My ry next week if i can

get any boddy to so it for me

i want you to come to so

wheat if you can get off

i beleave I want to see

you now wos than i ever

did in My life and the childn

all want to see you mity

bad it looks like that i

wood give any thing to get to

see you once more but if

we never meet in this

trobblesome world i hope

that we will meet in a

better one where troubble

and sorrows will have and

end i have studed lots a

bout  you sence you left

it just looks like i art

to see you come in ever

nite looks like you mist

 

Page 4

 

was than you ever was i am

a heap lonesome than I

ever was before you are

missed at all times and

by all the children all want

to see you a comeing home

mity bad a gain i here

the canons roaring ever once

and a while it makes me

feel awful bad i dont

no how soon you should

be slain up on the Battel

field but My faith is strong

for you to get to exscape

the Danges there is in a

Battle I want you to rite

as soon as you get this

letter soi must come to a

close by saying that i

remain youre loveng wife till

Death from Mrs Malinda

Canon to Mr J M Canon

rite soon fail not

 

 

 

[Gordon County, Georgia][1]

This October the 16th, 1863

My dear husband,

It is with great pleasure that I have seated myself for the purpose of dropping you a few lines which will inform you that Columbus[2] has been sick more than a week having chills every day and the rest of us is all tolerable well.  I truly hope those few lines may come safe to your kind hand in due time and find you enjoying the state of good health.  I received your kind letter the 14th of this instant, and I was blest with joy to hear from you and to hear that you was well.  Milton, I want you to write to me whether you have got any tents [to] stay in or not or whether you have to take the weather as it comes or not.  I want you, if there is any chance for you to get to come home, to get a furlough and come this winter.  I was glad to hear that your health was still improving.  I pray for your health all the time and that you may get to come home again and come through these miserable, distressing battles.  It is my honorable desire that  you may be spared through all danger and get to come home and spend a few more days in pleasure as we have once in time past and gone.  I saw Mr. Barnwell,[3] and he told me how you was getting, and he also gave me that money that you sent.  I am a-going to sow my rye next week if I can get anybody to sow it for me.  I want you to come to sow wheat if you can get off.  I believe I want to see you now worse than I ever did in my life, and the children all want to see you mighty bad.  It looks like that I would give anything to get to see you once more, but if we never meet in this troublesome world, I hope that we will meet in a better one where trouble and sorrows will have an end.  I have studied lots about you since you left.  It just looks like I ought to see you come in every night, [it] looks like.  You [are] missed worse than you ever was.  I am a heap [more] lonesome than I ever was before.  You are missed at all times and by all.  The children all want to see you a-coming home mighty bad again.  I hear the cannons roaring ever once in a while.  It makes me feel awful bad.  I don’t know how soon you should be slain upon the battlefield, but my faith is strong for you to get to escape the dangers there is in a battle.  I want you to write as soon as you get this letter.  So I must come to a close by saying that I remain your loving wife ‘til death. 

From Mrs. Malinda Cannon to Mr. J. M. Cannon

Write soon!  Fail not!

 


 

[1] Malinda Cannon and her children lived on their farm in Gordon County, Georgia, during the Civil War.

 

[2] William Columbus “Clum” Cannon, the third child born to John and Malinda Cannon, was born on March 1, 1853, in Gordon County, Georgia.  He would have been ten years old when his mother wrote this letter.  Clum moved to Texas with his mother and siblings in the late-1860s.  Family legend says that he and his three brothers were known as the “Wild Cannons” for either their high spirits or their ability to break wild horses.  Clum married Amanda Ellender Post in 1890.  He died in Haskell County, Texas, in 1918.

 

[3] According to the 1860 Georgia Census, four men with the last name of Barnwell lived in Gordon County and were of an age to fit the description of “Mr. Barnwell.”  In 1863 Thomas B. Barnwell, who lived in Silaquoy in 1860, would have been 43.  A “T. B. Barnwell” served in Company F, 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry.   Also, in 1863 Robert Barnwell, who lived in Sonora in 1860, would have been 47.  Robert Barnwell had two sons who would have been old enough to be enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1863.  His son Thomas D. Barnwell would have been 21 in 1863, and another son David M. Barnwell would have been 18.  A Thomas E. Barnwell and a David M. Barnwell served in Company E, 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry.

 

 

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