Nov. 13, 1863. Malinda Cannon to J.M. Cannon

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                      Translation

 November the 13 1863

Dear Husband it is with the

gratiest pleasure that i seat my

self this eavening to drop you

a few lines in order that you may

no that we are all well at this

time truly hopeing thos few

lines may come safe to your

cind hand in dew time and

find you enjoying good health

i receive your cind letter

yesterday wich i was blest to

here from you but was sorry

to here that you was in good

health but I pray that you

will be well and harty when

yu get this letter i started

you some permition and a pair

of sock and comfert by Mr.

Mosly he went as far a dalton

and they woodent let him go

no furder the gards woodent let

him pass                  turn over

 

Page 2

 

i want you to rite to me wether

you want me to send you any clothes

by any boddy or not or blanket

you rote that you was a comeing

home i shall be a blides to

look for you home now wethe

i see you or not i want you to

come home to stay all the winter

if ther is any chance at tall

theing going on a bout like they

was when you left hom but

looks like if you dont get to

come home to help make a crop

that we will all come to

Suffernes another year milton

i will relate to you the death of

Jo Powell he died on the 5 day

of this inst i will close my

short letter i remain your

loveing wife tell Death rite soon

for that is all the satisfaction

i see is to get a letter from

J. M. Canon                 Malinda Canon

 

 

 

November the 13th, 1863

Dear husband,

It is with the greatest pleasure that I seat myself this evening to drop you a few lines in order that you may know that we are all well at this time, truly hoping those few lines may come safe to your kind hand in due time and find you enjoying good health.  I received your kind letter yesterday which I was blest to hear from you but was sorry to hear that you was [not] in good health, but I pray that you will be well and hearty when you get this letter.  I started you some provisions and a pair of socks and comfort by Mr. Mosly.[1] He went as far as Dalton,[2] and they wouldn’t let him go no further.  The guards wouldn’t let him pass.  I want you to write me whether you want me to send you any clothes by anybody or not or blanket.  You wrote that you was a-coming home.  I shall be obliged to look for you home now whether I see you or not.  I want you to come home to stay all the winter if there is any chance at all.  Things [are] going on about like they was when left home, but looks like if you don’t get to come home to help make a crop that we will all come to sufferance another year.  Milton, I will relate to you the death of Jo. Powell.[3] He died on the 5th day of this inst.  I will close my short letter.  I remain your loving wife ‘til death.  Write soon, for that is all the satisfaction I see is to get a letter from J. M. Cannon

                                                Malinda Cannon

 


 

[1] John Milton Cannon was a partner in a tannery with a Mr. Mosely.

 

[2] Dalton, Georgia, is where Milton spent the winter of 1863-1864.

 

[3] Josias “Josie” S. Powell was born in 1817 in North or South Carolina.  He married Mary Magdaline Butler in approximately 1847.  Mary was the daughter of Hosea Butler and his wife Mary Pauline “Polly” Cleland Butler.  Josie and Mary reared ten children and farmed in Gordon County, Georgia, where Milton and Malinda lived until Milton joined the Confederate Army.  Josie died on November 5, 1863, and was buried in a cemetery on his farm near Red Bone Ridge in Gordon County.  Mary lived until May 22, 1907, and was also buried on the farm.

 

 

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