Jan. 10, 1864. J.M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

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            January the 10the 1864

     Camp near Dolton

Dear wife I seet my self

this morning to Rit you

a few lines to let you no

how I am git along I hav

Bin sick ever since I got back

to Campes I am so as to bee

up and about to day I think

I will git well now if I

dont git no back set I hop

those few lines will com

safe to your handes in du

time and find you all

well I hav no news to

rit to you at this time

onley we hav mity Cold

wether hear now we hav

got splendid litle Cabins

to stay in hear I never got

to Campes tell sunday

 

Page 2

 

night I staid in Calhoun

untell sunday eaving I

staid with grisam mother

you dont no how bad I want

to Com home I want to see

you all as bad as I ever did

I want you to do the best

you Can and tak as good

cear of the thinges as you

Can you must bee mity

saving of your corn hulday

I want you and Mary to bee

good girls Columbus you

and frank ust bee good litle

Boyes and mind your

mother and then when I

Com home I will love to

see you all A heep beter

I must close for this time

so nothing more onley I remain yours as ever

    J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

 

 

 

      January the 10th, 1864

   Camp near Dalton[1] [Georgia]

Dear wife,

I seat myself this morning to write you a few lines to let you know how I am getting along.  I have been sick ever since I got back to camps.  I am so as to be up and about today.  I think I will get well now if I don’t get no backset.  I hope those few lines will come safe to your hands in due time and find you all well.  I have no news to write to you at this time, only we have mighty cold weather here now.  We have got splendid little cabins to stay in here.[2]  I never got to camps ‘til Sunday night.  I stayed in Calhoun until Sunday evening.  I stayed with Grisam.[3]  Mother, you don’t know how bad I want to come home.  I want to see you all as bad as I ever did.  I want you to do the best you can and take as good care of the things as you can.  You must be mighty saving of your corn.  Hulday,[4] I want you and Mary[5] to be good girls, Columbus,[6] you and Frank[7] must be good little boys and mind your mother, and then when I come home, I will love to see you all a heap better.  I must close for this time so nothing more, only I remain yours as ever.

    J. M. Cannon to Malinda Cannon

 


 

[1] Dalton, Georgia was the winter camp of General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of Tennessee in 1863, the second main army of the Confederacy.  Its morale was restored here after the disaster on November 23-25, 1863, at the Battle of Chattanooga under General Braxton Bragg.  Dalton was an important railroad town on the Western and Atlantic Railroad which connected Chattanooga with Atlanta.  A northern line, the East Tennessee and Georgia, connected east Tennessee with Dalton.

 

[2] For shelter during extended stays, General Joseph Johnston’s army built villages of solidly built log huts chinked with clay and complete with fireplaces.  The huts had rough beds and lounges where the men could play cards, read novels, and write letters.  Such great quantities of wood were used that in 1862-1863, when the army moved on, the huts were occasionally torn down and the logs hauled to the railroad where they were used as fuel for the train engines. At other times, the camps were simply abandoned.

 

[3] Possibly, the reference is to either John Gresham, the Sheriff of Gordon County in 1860, or his son William S. Grisham.  Both men lived in Calhoun, Gordon County in 1860.  1860 Georgia Census, Gordon County, Calhoun.

 

[4] Huldah Cannon, oldest child of John and Malinda Cannon, was born in 1848 in Gordon County, Georgia.  She married George Washington Crone in 1867.  In the late-1860s the Crones moved from Gordon County, Georgia, and settled eventually in Smith County, Texas, where Huldah died in 1948.

 

[5] Mary Elizabeth Cannon, second-born child of John and Malinda Cannon, was born n 1850 in Gordon County, Georgia.  She married John H. Goodman.  The Goodmans also settled in Smith County, Texas, where Mary died in 1884.

 

[6] William Columbus “Clum” Cannon, third-born child of John and Malinda Cannon, was born in 1853 in Gordon County, Georgia.  He moved to Texas with his mother and siblings in the late-1860s.  Family legend says that he and his three brothers were known as the “Wild Cannons” for either their high spirits or their ability to break wild horses.  Clum married Amanda Ellender Post in 1890.  He died in Haskell County, Texas, in 1918.

[7] James Franklin “Frank” Cannon, fourth-born child of John and Malinda Cannon, was born in 1854 in Gordon County, Georgia.  Like his brothers and sisters, Frank moved to Texas with his mother in the late-1860s.  A “Wild Cannon,” Frank  settled down when he married Etta Frances Hunt in 1881 in Kaufman County, Texas.  The couple eventually lieved and reared their family in Hall County, Texas, where Frank died in 1948.

 

 

 

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