Jul. 7, 1862. J. D. Rich and W. R. Rich to Hulda Cannon

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                      Translation

J. D. Richís and W. R. Richís letters of July 7, 1862

 

 

Camp Beaulieu Ga

          July the 7 1862

Deare Cosin i seet my self

this Eavning to give yew

a ancer for your cind letter

that Mr andrue fetcht i was

glad to heare from yew and to

heare that yew was well this letter

leavs mee in bad health i hant

bin well in a week or two i hope

at these few lines will find yew

well huldah yew wanted to no

something a bout Girls down

heare i hant seen nare gal since

we left savannah but there is pirty

Girls in savannah till yew cant

rest but they never psterd mee

nor i never them huldah i think

at i will bee at hom by the

Middle of this month and then

i can tell yew all a bout thing

yew said at yew would love to

see mee cook some i hant cook

 

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much since i came into camps

So nomore at present only i remain

your loving cosin unt death

J D Rich To Huldah Cannon

 

Deare Cosin i seet my self this

Eavning to Drop yew a few lines

to let yew now that i am well

at present and i hope at these few

lines may come saft to hand

and find yew well huldah

yew wanted to no what

i thoght of girls down heare

there is some mity pirty ones

in savannah but i hant said

a word to one since i come hear

nor i dont expect two yew

wanted to no how i like to

stay in camps i dont like it

at tall Huldah yew must

rite to mee ever chance and

i will dwo the same So

Nomore at present only i remain

your cosin until dath  W R Rich to hulah can

                                                              non

 

 

 

Camp Beaulieu, Georgia             July the 7th, 1862

Dear cousin,

I seat myself this evening to give you a answer for your kind letter that Mr. Andrew fetched.  I was glad to hear from you and to hear that you was well.  This letter leaves me in bad health.  I havenít been well in a week or two.  I hope that these few lines will find you well.  Huldah,[1] you wanted to know something about girls down here.  I havenít seen nary gal since we left Savannah, but there is pretty girls in Savannah Ďtil you canít rest, but they never pestered me nor I never them.  Huldah, I think that I will be at home by the middle of this month, and then I can tell you all about things.  You said that you would love to see me cook some.  I havenít cooked much since I came into camps.  So no more at present, only I remain your loving cousin until death.

J. D. Rich[2] to Huldah Cannon

 

Dear cousin

I seat myself this evening to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well at present, and I hope that these few lines may come safe to hand and find you well.  Huldah, you wanted to know what I thought of girls down here.  There is some mighty pretty ones in Savannah, but I havenít said a word to one since I come here, nor do I expect to.  You wanted to know how I like to stay in camps.  I donít like it at all.  Huldah, you must write to me ever chance, and I will do the same.  So no more at present, only I remain your cousin until death. 

W. R. Rich[3] to Huldah Cannon    

 


 

[1] Huldah Cannon was the first-born child of Malinda and John Milton Cannon.  She was born September 16, 1844, in Calhoun, Gordon County, Georgia.  She was 13 when her cousins wrote this letter to her.  Her parents almost certainly named her after her fatherís sister Hulda Serena Cannon Rich Powell.  In the late-1860s Huldah moved to Texas with her mother, siblings, and husband George Washington Crone.  Eventually, the Crones settled in Smith County, Texas.  Huldah died there in 1948.

 

[2] James ďJimmyĒ Dyson Rich was the second of four sons born to Hulda Serena Cannon and her first husband William Rich.   Hulda was the sister of John Milton Cannon, and William was the brother of Ellender Malinda Rich Cannon; thus James refers to John Milton Cannon as ďUncle John.Ē  James was born April 19, 1844.  He was 18 when he wrote this letter to his young cousin Huldah Cannon.  After the Civil War ended, James moved first to Tennessee and then to Texas, settling with his younger brother Jesse Pearson Rich in Anderson County.  He died on June 6, 1924, in Anderson County, Texas.

 

[3] An older brother to James Dyson Rich, William Russell Rich was the first-born son of Hulda Serena Cannon and her first husband William Rich.  William was born on January 18, 1843, in Calhoun, Gordon County, Georgia.  He was 19 when he wrote this letter to his cousin Huldah.  William died on June 8, 1863, at the age of 20, of a fever in a hospital for Confederate soldiers in Canton, Mississippi.

 

 

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